Thursday, April 22, 2010

Beating up the Police

German police — cartoon

Caption: Society of tolerance made numb by age, fear, and anti-discrimination

Left balloon: “Do something! I order you to show civil courage and go to help my colleague!”

Right balloon: “Absolutely not! They’ll kill you and I am supposed to let these young men walk free, as they expect!”


We’ve reported in the past about the no-go areas in various German cities which even the police do not dare to enter without fear of violent attack. As the earlier report said:

“The problem with violence against the police has escalated in recent years. The police have to concentrate increasingly on self-protection” says national chief of police Konrad Freiberg to Die Welt. “When a fellow policeman goes on duty, he never knows what might happen to him”.

Many thanks to JLH for translating the following article on the same topic from Tuesday’s Der Spiegel. Like most European media reports, the ethnicity of the thugs is not mentioned. However, as Mark Steyn has frequently mentioned, whenever there is violent mayhem in a European city, more often than not the name “Muhammad” appears in the police report:

Attack on the Train Platform
Youths Beat Up Police

April 20, 2010
by Jörg Diehl


Attack in a train station: A 16 year-old and a 21 year-old are said to have beaten up a federal policeman in Lower Rhine Wesel. According to Spiegel-Online information, the policeman, dressed in civilian clothes, had called the attention of one of the perpetrators to the no smoking ban in trains.

Hamburg. The assault seemed like a mocking comment on the words. Just a week after the highest federal policeman in an internal memo had demanded an improved police presence in train stations, one of his officers was pummeled by two young men — in a train station.

Just before 10:00 PM on the evening of March 30, in a local express from Duisburg to Emmerich. according to information obtained by Spiegel-Online, police inspector Carsten S., 30 years old, spoke to a group of young men. The officer from the police inspection station Duisburg was on his way home and dressed in civilian clothes. He pointed out to the young people that smoking was not allowed in the train. He was severely insulted (“ the cops!”)

The attack followed in the train station at Wesel, Lower Rhine. Muhammad A., 16, who had already clashed with Carsten S. in the train, and Cantekin E., 21, clobbered the police inspector with blows and kicks until he collapsed. When he called for help and said he was a policeman, no one at first reacted. Then one bystander took pity on him and helped the police who rushed in a little later to take the assailants into custody.

Severe Wounds on Head and Stomach

The perpetrators who injured Carsten S. on the head, stomach, and one hand were well known to police. Cantekin E. had already been investigated for grievous bodily harm, threatening, and robbery. His companion, Muhammad A. is a multiple offender.

Neither the investigating police in Wesel nor the federal police made the incident public. When Spiegel-Online asked why, a federal police spokesperson said that they had not thought it to be important.

Perhaps the officials feared a renewed debate about general security on buses and trains. On March 22, federal police president Matthias Seeger sent out an internal letter underlining the necessity to be more visible in local and mainline stations. 66% of his people would spend their time on patrol.

A less than Complimentary Report
- - - - - - - - -
According to Spiegel-Online information, the background of the circulated letter was a less than complimentary report on the federal police by the federal audit court. In more than a quarter of the 121 stations, the examiners had found that there were too few officers to man the station and simultaneously patrol.

Therefore, the federal police, who are responsible for security in train stations, must be better organized. According to the examiners, besides a deficit in personnel, there was also a lack of guidelines and concepts for fielding officers in the stations.

As if that were not enough: the burnout rate among federal police is worrisomely high. A study by the Interior Ministry adds to this conclusion. Between the first investigation in 2006 and the second in 2008, the number of affected police officers rose from 15% to 25%. The burnout rate for local and provincial police, on the other hand, is only 10%.

Security Offensive

In the middle of March, the railroad announced a security offensive. Among other things, the railroad’s own security personnel in heavily populated areas will be raised by 150 and video surveillance will be improved. This positive signal from the railroad, according to the federal police president’s communication, could also raise questions about the visible presence of the federal police, which Seeger intends to improve.

According to the account of an eyewitness, the federal police receiving the call for help had to come from Duisburg, Kleve, or Oberhausen and needed a solid three hours to come to the assistance of their colleague, Carsten S. Local police were quicker, arriving in ten minutes.

Meanwhile, the suspected assailants are walking around free.

9 comments:

nimbus said...

When I lived as an American in Germany from 1979 - 1992, they used to mock my country for how violent it was. Now look at them. At least in the States, as far as I know, there were no no-go zones, police and civil authorities could go where needed.

Back then in Germany, it was SAFE to go anywhere you wanted. How things have changed.

Zenster said...

The perpetrators who injured Carsten S. on the head, stomach, and one hand were well known to police. Cantekin E. had already been investigated for grievous bodily harm, threatening, and robbery. His companion, Muhammad A. is a multiple offender. [emphasis added]

Despite his previous convictions for multiple offenses, the conspicuously named Muhammad A. was, nonetheless, freely available to perpetrate his assault upon an out-of-uniform police officer as the opportunity presented itself.

Neither the investigating police in Wesel nor the federal police made the incident public. When Spiegel-Online asked why, a federal police spokesperson said that they had not thought it to be important.

Perish the thought that an average citizen might be given even a slight understanding of how dangerous their political elite has opted to make Germany for them.

Few other actions can possibly precipitate the much needed swing in public opinion like assaults upon the police themselves. In or out of uniform notwithstanding, it is only when law enforcement officers are finally put at risk in the course of ordinary activities that there will evolve any useful change in public policy.

Should that change not be forthcoming, there is no more certain starting gun for the onset of vigilantism in the public sector.

Gary Rumain said...

nimbus,

Ever been to Dearborn?

Anonymous said...

You know what? I prefer a situation like that to the one in the USA. I prefer a situation where the police are clearly aware of who their enemies are, and who they are not. In the USA the police have come to identify themselves as some sort of superior class with the right to direct the behavior of "civilians". They don't consider themselves civilians anymore. They consider suspects guilty until proven innocent, and with the anarcho-tyrannic law regime we have, they can just about always find some sort of reason to put someone in jail and keep them there. They confiscate cash and computers and vehicles when they feel like it; they are rewarded for essentially highway robbery. They run speed traps for the primary purpose of revenue, not safety - the larger and more corrupt the city, the less pretense there is about the purpose. They are allied to the judges and lawyers in squeezing money out of the people, rather than defending the people against their enemies. I could go on, but I have a meeting to go look bored in.

They have become the occupying mercenary army the Founders warned us about.

I would much prefer a place where the police know they and I are allies and friends.

Cyrus said...

Zenster, vigilantism of civilians not withstanding, state action will not be forthcoming until the political class begin feeling the pain and effects of their little experiment here.

Zenster said...

Cyrus: ... vigilantism of civilians not withstanding, state action will not be forthcoming until the political class begin feeling the pain and effects of their little experiment here.

Agreed and that is precisely why predation upon law enforcement officers has such potential as a catalyst. As the police see that they are being abandoned by their superiors, protection will slowly be withdrawn for the elite.

While the upper class traditionally has been able to provide its own security in the form of gated communities and armed response for-hire, there still exists a threshold beyond which the spouses, children and relatives of these Eurabian aparatchiks become vulnerable.

Constant erosion of the support required by law enforcement to operate effectively means that even the elite or, at least, their kith and kin will become vulnerable at some point. Far more disturbing is the possibility that an antagonized indigenous population might take out its anger on less well-protected family members of these traitors.

Were it done in a way which redirected attention towards Muslim colonizers, that might act as a trigger for the necessary shift in policy.

Due to the immense amounts of both political and personal capital that has been invested in this ham fisted Social Engineering, look for top-down change being inspired by bottom-up radicalism. Muslim predation is already driving European populations towards a breaking point that is only exacerbated by the mounting financial crisis.

No way can the branch be bent much further without snapping.

Anonymous said...

nimbus, that's because Germany wasn't non-European enough for these things to show. America was. If America was almost all European descent, it would have been the same as Germany.

Rocha said...

RV,

It depends on wich america you are talking about. The 50's, 60's,70's or todays america. America was in the 50's and 60's more than 90% white with large areas without minorities since. Most of the remaining 10% was in the south.

But yes you are right.

Anonymous said...

Rocha, that was what I was saying. Germany was over 90% white European in the 1980s. When the US was 89% white in the 1960s, you had the same as Germany. But again, back when I wanted to move to the US, I had the 1950s US in mind, not the overtaxed, over-regulated, invaded America that is there today.