Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Culturally Enriched Slavery at the Naval War College

Cultural Enrichment News

Below is yet another instance of an Arab master who imported a Filipina maid into the USA and then turned her into a slave. Interestingly enough, the officer in question has been released on his own recognizance and is still allowed to attend classes at the Naval War College.

Although there’s no mention of it in the article, if this case is like the vast majority of other Arab-Filipina slavery cases, the guy was also sexually abusing his “maid”.

Notice that the incident has a Mohammed Coefficient of 200% — the alleged perp is a double-Mo.

According to The Marine Corps Times:

UAE Officer at War College Facing Fraud Charges

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A United Arab Emirates naval officer who attends the Newport-based Naval War College was charged Tuesday with luring a foreign servant to the United States, then failing to pay her and keeping her confined in his house.

During an arraignment in U.S. District Court in Providence, Col. Arif Mohamed Saeed Mohamed Al-Ali pleaded not guilty to visa fraud and lying to a government official. A federal magistrate judge released him on personal recognizance.

In July, the officer and his family brought a woman from the Philippines to live with them in an off-campus two-story colonial when Al-Ali began his studies at the college, said Mary Rogers, an assistant U.S. attorney. The Naval War College provides graduate-level military education to U.S. and foreign militaries.

Al-Ali and the Filipino woman, who has not been identified, signed a contract to employ her as a housemaid, working 40 hours a week for $10 per hour.

Instead, Al-Ali didn’t pay her, took away her passport, forced her to work seven days a week — often until midnight — and refused to let her leave the family’s East Greenwich house alone or talk to anybody outside his family, Rogers said. She said the woman ultimately escaped and now is in hiding.

Al-Ali brought his wife and five children with him from the United Arab Emirates, and the Filipino woman was a nanny who took care of Al-Ali’s 4-year-old child, said defense attorney Victoria Walton.

When approached by agents from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in February, Al-Ali showed them a document signed by the woman that showed he had paid her $19,000 in cash for a year’s worth of work, Rogers said. The prosecutor said a subsequent investigation found no evidence that Al-Ali had paid the woman, and the woman told federal officials that she had been forced to sign the document.

Walton said misunderstandings and a language barrier may have affected Al-Ali’s interaction with federal officials. She called Al-Ali a respected member of his country’s navy with no prior criminal record in the U.S. or abroad.

U.S. District Magistrate Judge Lincoln Almond denied prosecutors’ request to secure $10,000 bail. He did, however, restrict Al-Ali’s travel to Rhode Island, with exceptions for trips taken in connection with his classes at the war college, which Walton said will end June 10.

Almond also ordered that the officer not be given his passport, which defense attorneys said is being held by officials at the United Arab Emirates’ embassy in Washington. He scheduled a hearing to discuss what will happen once Al-Ali’s courses end and his visa expires.

Benjamin Caldwell, another attorney for Al-Ali, declined to comment on the decision after the arraignment.

Al-Ali will continue his studies at the college, said Cmdr. Carla McCarthy, a spokeswoman for the college.


For a complete listing of previous enrichment news, see The Cultural Enrichment Archives.

Hat tip: HD.

16 comments:

Call Me Mom said...

Perhaps, that's because such behavior is not illegal in his home country, so how would he have a criminal record there?

Is anyone else wondering why we are training foreign officers at a War College here?

S said...

I'm wondering also about his attendance.

Plus he understands the language enough to attend college but not to talk to the feds?

This is another reason why countries such as Mexico and the Phillipines (especially them) need to make sure their people, who they export in high numbers to work in other lands, should be teaching the people English from an early age. If they end up in trouble in another land, English is a universal language and they will find some help.

bruce said...

ragheads still practice slavery and other evil and in humain things like cutting off heads.these scum should not be allowed in to this country.

Zenster said...

She called Al-Ali a respected member of his country’s navy with no prior criminal record in the U.S. or abroad.

You beat me to it, Call Me Mom.

Call Me Mom: Perhaps, that's because such behavior is not illegal in his home country, so how would he have a criminal record there?

In a culture that rarely, if ever, prosecutes men for rape, spousal assault or forcible spousal rape, sexual child molestation and rape or solicitation of prostitution, it isn't too difficult to imagine that an (alleged) abuser like this is free of any criminal record.

I have made sure that all of my friends in the Philippines are aware of how frequently female OFWs (Overseas Foreign Workers) are victims of sexual and physical assault at the hands of Muslim employers, usually in combination. I always make sure to warn them off of working in any Islamic country or for any Muslim client.

SHARI'A CONDONED SLAVERY IS ALIVE AND WELL IN ISLAM

Zenster said...

S: This is another reason why countries such as Mexico and the Philippines (especially them) need to make sure their people, who they export in high numbers to work in other lands, should be teaching the people English from an early age. If they end up in trouble in another land, English is a universal language and they will find some help.

In reality, S, the Philippines has an amazingly high literacy rate when compared to any other semi-industrialized Southeast Asian nation and conducts all public education in English.

I am becoming increasingly convinced that the Philippines is Southeast Asia's "canary in the coal mine". Much in the way that Israel fulfills a similar role in the Middle East.

Lawrence said...

We train foreign officers all the time at our war colleges. People just don't know that. Issue is to build diplomacy and rapport among the world's military establishments. And it actually works.

One of our most effective diplomatic tools in dealing with foreign governments is the rapport (and most importantly respect) that their military establishment has with our own.

Their governments may paint our military as a bunch of weak, pasty, lazy-buts, but when their officers attend our schools, their officers come away with a much different perspective, and take that perspective back home with them.

babs said...

Well Lawrence, that's great. My son has trained with officers from KSA, UAE, etc. Our training and our dollars are going to nations that have no intention of helping us with anything.
How about the perspective be brought "back home" when we pound them into the sand? Until then, I resent these people occupying a seat in our Naval colleges.

Zenster said...

Lawrence: Their governments may paint our military as a bunch of weak, pasty, lazy-buts, but when their officers attend our schools, their officers come away with a much different perspective, and take that perspective back home with them.

Much like recruiting nations to purchase Western armaments so that they are less inclined to side with opposing regimes like Russian and China, there is also some benefit from inculcating them with Western military doctrine.

There may even be some use in exposing the military elite of these nations to our Western way of life such they might be reluctant about cutting off all ties to it.

That said, providing this sort of strategic tutorial service to such undying enemies as this world's assorted Islamic nations makes babs' suggestion that "the perspective be brought 'back home' when we pound them into the sand", far more appealing.

Michael Farris said...

S: "This is another reason why countries such as Mexico and the Phillipines (especially them) need to make sure their people, who they export in high numbers to work in other lands, should be teaching the people English from an early age."

If the governments of those countries worked well enough to actually do that ... they wouldn't need to export so many people.

"English is a universal language"

One of the drawbacks of widespread English (as a second or third language) is that it makes anglophone countries a magnet for immigration. Lots of britain/ireland bound pseudo-refugees list that as a reason to try to make it to those countries - they've invested years in learning English and (sort of) know it. This makes the UK more attractive for them than France or Italy (not to mention Finland or some Slavic language)

Carl said...

I think that if he can communicate with immigration to justify her presence and attend our NAVEL COL
LEGE HE CAN COMMUNICATE WELL ENOUGH!It is true that women in the Philippines need to be advised against these dangers abroad however, the driving force there is poverty unlike anything that we know in the US unless you have traveled and lived there. For a young Filipino girl to leave for a better life is the dream of her's and her family. Often Filipino's go to the Middle East as a segway trying to get into the US, UK or Canada.Object poverty , a lack of opportunity and childhood dreams of a better life are the root of this problem because there will always be people to take advantage.Even Filipino men will in effect sell their women by way of "match Making".
Regardless of the reasons, which are many, when this behavior is found to happen in the US it should be proscuted like it would be for any American.
A more disturbing question is "why following 911 do we have Arabs in or military colleges"???????

scherado said...

Only 'Mi-mi' could would worse than 'Mo-mo' as a nickname. Just an observation...

Lawrence said...

babs said... Until then, I resent these people occupying a seat in our Naval colleges..

I undertand your sentiment, but you miss the point.

There is a difference between individual professionals fighting on opposites sides of a conflict, and their respective political machines driving the conflict.

A foreign military is less likely to encourage engaging our forces in combat, and in man nations their militaries have a huge say in whether or not they go to war.

We keep approaching this problem from a "Western" mind-set when we really need to approach it from a "Middle-east/Arab" mind-set.

I'm not saying we have to accept them. I'm saying we have to understand them. And the only thing they understand is power.

Bringing individual officers to our military schools to get a real vision of our military strength is as much deterrent as shooting them.

Two additional things we need to understand.

1. Their military pays for much of their education in our schools.

2. We don't give them access to our highest level of military secrecy/capabilities.

Lawrence said...

We had a few foreign artillery officers train with us during my course at Ft. Sill, several from the Middle East.

What they learn is that if they ever wanted to engage their Arty Battallion against a U.S. force, they basically have one shot at us before we wipe them from the map.

They still use pen-paper target plotting from WWII-Korea vintage. While ours is driven digitaly via a range of advanced technologies.

It is a huge deterrent to their military and their nations military agendas when that officer goes back to his unit and has to make the call to fire upon our forces. Knowing that he's got one shot in his gun, and after than we'll destroy his gun, makes him think two or three times before making the call to fire.

Expound on this example in the greater strategic sense, and it makes enemy nations leaders think two or three times before picking a military fight with us.

Peace through strength works, but it doesn't always require using that strength. Sometimes all it takes is making sure the other guy understands the disparity between his capabilities and ours.

Lawrence said...

But then, I'm not condoning we allow him to stay given his force servitude of the woman in question.

He should as a minimum be expelled from the school on Honor violations, held under house arrest, and investigated accordingly.

I haven't read up on the details, so I don't know what all actions are taking place against him other than what is posted in this forum.

Hesperado said...

I can't believe a reader above actually argues the merits of having Muslims attend our military academies in order to impress them with our superiority. All Muslims should be deported. Any given Muslim could do another Fort Hood massacre (let alone massacres of civilian areas).

The goal should not be to "impress" Muslims with our prowess and superiority, but simply to a) segregate them from the rest of humanity, and b) kill enough of them to make them stop trying to expand and metastasize their deadly geopolitical and sociopolitical virus.

1389 said...

@Hesperado

Agree 100 percent.

The only contact that Muslims should ever have with the US military is at the receiving end of our projectiles.