Saturday, October 11, 2008

Nobel Peace Prize Awarded for Appeasement of Jihad

The Fjordman Report

The noted blogger Fjordman is filing this report via Gates of Vienna.
For a complete Fjordman blogography, see The Fjordman Files. There is also a multi-index listing here.



Granting this year’s Nobel Peace Prize to Finnish diplomat Martti Ahtisaari, known for his role in establishing a Jihadist state in Kosovo, makes the Peace Prize even more of a joke than it already was. Those who want an alternative view on the situation in the Balkans can read the essays of Serge Trifkovic and his book Defeating Jihad: How the War on Terrorism Can Be Won — in Spite of Ourselves.

As Chief United Nations negotiator for Kosovo, Ahtisaari caused anger in Serbia when he stated that “Serbs are guilty as a people,” implying that they would have to pay for it, possibly by losing Kosovo. It is one thing to criticize the Milosevic regime. It is quite another thing to claim that “Serbs are guilty as a people.” If anybody in the Balkans can be called guilty as a people, it is the Turks, not the Serbs. The Turks have left a trail of blood across much of Europe, Asia Minor, and the Mediterranean for centuries, culminating in the Armenian genocide in the 20th century, which Turkey still refuses to acknowledge, let alone apologize for.

As I’ve indicated before, if the Peace Prize is supposed to serve any real purpose, it needs to be awarded to persons who confront Jihad, not appease it like Martti Ahtisaari and Jimmy Carter, or promote it like Yasser Arafat:

As I have written previously in “Give the Nobel Peace Prize to Ayaan Hirsi Ali”:

In my view, the Norwegian Nobel Committee will soon have to make a choice: If they want the Nobel Peace Prize to be a Global Celebrity Award for Outstanding Achievements in Political Correctness, they can give the next one to Bono of rock group U2. Or, they can do something meaningful, something that will actually advance the cause of peace and human liberty around the world, and award the Nobel Peace Prize to Ayaan Hirsi Ali.

Since members of national assemblies and parliaments can nominate candidates for the Prize, I hereby challenge MPs from the Progress Party in my country, or MPs from any infidel nation, to nominate Hirsi Ali. Other alternatives can be mentioned, too. Ibn Warraq, Ali Sina and Wafa Sultan are all worthy recipients of the Prize for their work and for championing the rights of one of the most abused and oppressed groups of people on the planet: Former Muslims who defy the traditional death penalty for leaving Islam.

Or, if the members of the Committee want somebody with a non-Muslim background, what about Dutch politician Geert Wilders, who has remained steadfast in opposing Islamization despite the murders of his countrymen Theo van Gogh and Pim Fortuyn and the exile of Hirsi Ali? Author Robert Spencer, director of the website Jihad Watch, who patiently monitors the spread of Jihad terrorism across the world, is another excellent choice, as is Bat Ye’or, whose unique work on the plight of non-Muslims under Islamic rule has contributed immensely to our understanding of both the past and the present.
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Being Norwegian myself, I would also like to make a suggestion to Norwegian authorities: Norway is, or at least was the last time I checked, the planet’s third largest exporter of oil, after Saudi Arabia and Russia. If Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest exporter of oil, spends money on promoting Jihad and sharia, is it not fair that Norway, the world’s third largest exporter of oil, should spend a little on combating the same? The Norwegian Petroleum Fund amounts to hundreds of billions of dollars. Norwegian authorities could easily create a fund of a billion dollars or more earmarked for the defense of persons threatened for criticizing Islam. That’s the least we can do in return for being blessed with wealth we did very little to earn.

This fund could be called the Theo van Gogh Memorial Fund, the Asma bint Marwan Memorial Fund after the poetess who was killed by Muhammad’s followers 1400 years ago for mocking Islam, or perhaps the Charles Martel Foundation for Intercultural Understanding. Most citizens in my country wouldn’t even notice if we spent a billion dollars on this, but such a fund, whatever we choose to call it, could have a big impact on the lives of people struggling to get their message across or simply to stay alive in the face of death threats.

11 comments:

Kim Hartveld said...

No Nobel Peace Prize for Hirsi Ali.
I don't want her in the company of an Arafat, Carter, AlBaradei, or Gore. Give it to Obama or Osama instead.

Zenster said...

... the Charles Martel Foundation for Intercultural Understanding.

For what it's worth, that's got my vote. Real subtle and all that.

Afonso Henriques said...

Yeah... when I heard Athissari I screamed "The Finnish guy!??" that one that Fjordman had unmasked...

Well, he's in good company: Yasser Arafat and Jimmy and (I don't know) others...

Brian Barker said...

I regret that the much neglected language,Esperanto did not receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At least nine British MP's nominated this global language, for the Prize.

Within a short period of 121 years Esperanto is now placed within the top 100 languages, out of 6,000 worldwide according to the CIA factbook. It it the 17th most used language by Wikipedia, and it is in active use by Facebook and Skype.

Solid arguments for Esperanto can be seen on the Youtube video, by Professor Piron, a former translator at the United Nations.

If you have time please check http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LV9XU

Yankee Doodle said...

“Serbs are guilty as a people,”

The Serbs have been demonized throughout this, equated to the Nazis.

The reverse is closer to the truth, and the quote here illustrates it. Demonizing an entire people is akin to what the Nazis did to the Jews, and here our protectors of multiculturalism and of the religion of peace are demonizing the Serb people.

Next, in the name of peace and anti-fascism, will they open death camps and start exterminating the Serbs? Many of the criminals in Kosovo would be all too happy.

I feel sorry for the decent people in Kosovo, not just the few Serbs that remain, but the decent people among the ethnic Albanian Kosovars -- they have been handed over to a criminal organization backed by the EU and the US and, unlike the Serbs, they have nowhere to run to.

And the root of it is not ideology; ideology motivates the footsoldiers of the left who do the work. They guys calling the shots are motivated by the money they are making through their connections to the arms-, narcotics- and human-trafficking going through the region, as well as to the big US-backed construction projects associated with the big oil pipeline.

At first, people scream ideology; next they scream oil.

Keep digging -- it comes up heroin. Pretty much every time you see these Arab-Afghan mujahideen and the US Government, scratch the surface once and it's oil, scratch it again and it's narcotics.

Vasarahammer said...

It is not fair to blame Ahtisaari for the way things turned out in Kosovo. It was the NATO operation against Serbia that settled matters. All Ahtisaari did was to get the relevant signatures to a peace treaty.

Although I find it ironic that wherever Ahtisaari negotiates a peace treaty, sharia law will soon rule supreme. Ahtisaari was responsible for the peace treaty in Aceh, which fell under sharia soon afterwards.

Ahtisaari served six year as President of Finland. He was a mediocre president but nowhere near as bad as the current holder of the office, Tarja Halonen. At least, Ahtisaari did not actively promote multiculturalism and nominate his leftist cronies to key government positions like president Halonen.

Robin Shadowes said...

There is another prize oftenly nicknamed the alternative Nobel-prize. I don't know much really, I know it was founded by a swede, Jacob von Uexkull, now living in Britain. If I'm not mistaken, the winners often comes from third world countries. I'm curious to as if they are as pc as the real Nobel-prize? Anyone have clue?

thll said...

Aren't there UN-inspired laws that forbids the demonising of a people?

thll said...

(forbid)

Afonso Henriques said...

"I feel sorry for the decent people in Kosovo, not just the few Serbs that remain, but the decent people among the ethnic Albanian Kosovars -- they have been handed over to a criminal organization backed by the EU and the US and, unlike the Serbs, they have nowhere to run to."

I really do think they have:
Albania;
Turkey;
Central Asia, the Caucasus, Saudi Arabia... they have many places to go.

Lucille said...

The creation of Esperanto predates the Nobel prizes by a few years.