Wednesday, October 29, 2008

War Aims

Back in 2003 there were several arguments in support of the Iraq war. Overthrowing Saddam Hussein, removing the possibility that he could use WMDs against Israel and the West, providing a staging ground for our troops on the border of Iran — all of these were good reasons.

The bombing of Serbia in 1999 should have made me leery of any war undertaken on behalf of Muslims by the US government, but I supported the Iraq campaign anyway.

Now it seems that the blood of American servicemen was shed so that the Shi’a of Iraq could run their own corrupt government without outside interference.

Poles, Italians, and Britons died so that sharia law could be officially codified in the US-approved constitution of Iraq.

This, and the fact that the Christian population of Iraq has dropped by about 60% since 2003, driven out by the murderous persecution of Muslims — that’s why we fought and bled in Mesopotamia.

Oh, and one other thing to take note of: in this, the best of all possible post-Saddam worlds, the Israelis are selling UAVs to Turkey to help the Turks kill the Kurds. According to ANSAmed:

Defence: Gonul in Israel to See Test Flights of UAVs

ANKARA, OCTOBER 27 — Turkey’s Defense Minister Vecdi Gonul will visit Greece between today and tomorrow upon invitation of his Greek counterpart and will travel to Israel on October 29-30 to see the demonstration and test flights of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVS) before their delivery to the Turkish military.
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In 2005, Israel Aircraft Industries and Elbit Systems won an estimated 150 million dollars contract to supply UAVs to the Turkish military.

Heron UAVs will be used in the fight against the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, which is based in northern Iraq. The Heron is capable of flying for 52 hours at altitudes over 30,000 feet. The aircraft will prevent the loss of life by conducting reconnaissance missions before military operations to strike at the terrorist group.

Two of the 10 Israeli-made Heron UAVS will be added to the Turkish military by the end of November, the Turkish Daily News has learned.

The ostensible idea is to defeat the PKK, but the Turks are somewhat indiscriminate in their animus towards the Kurds. Fighting the PKK often serves as a pretext for killing Kurds in general.

And much of the persecution of the Christians in northern Iraq is being perpetrated by the Kurds…

A plague on all their houses.


Hat tip: Insubria.

8 comments:

Armance said...

This is the result of the foolish idea to spread democracy in a Muslim country: Sharia institutionalized through Constitution and free elections. Back in Europe: wait for a decade or so until the new states Kosova and Bosnia become aggressive to their non-Muslim neighbors. I guess the American administration of that time will blame for the troubles the eternal "European nationalism".

Anonymous said...

I originally supported the Iraq war because we thought Saddam had WMDs that could potentially threaten us or our allies. And besides, back then I didn't know as much as I know now, especially about the historical precedent of Serbia. Who could have foreseen the institution of sharia law? So much for this being a war to help the Iraqis have democracy. Sharia is as undemocratic as you can get.

metrolefferts said...

Where did the Senator Tarzan video go? Please bring it back! It's wildly entertaining!

Henrik R Clausen said...

This, and our 'humanitarian intervention' in the Balkans, underscores what we in Europe agreed upon in 1648: Never start a war unless clearly in self-defense.

Even the worst of dictators have paid token obedience to this principle. We broke it overtly in 1999 with our 'humanitarian intervention' against Serbia, and things have been spinning somewhat out of control since. We need to get back to that principle, and deal with the fact that wars get started elsewhere that it is not our responsibility to stop.

Zenster said...

Now it seems that the blood of American servicemen was shed so that the Shi’a of Iraq could run their own corrupt government without outside interference.

Poles, Italians, and Britons died so that sharia law could be officially codified in the US-approved constitution of Iraq.

This, and the fact that the Christian population of Iraq has dropped by about 60% since 2003, driven out by the murderous persecution of Muslims — that’s why we fought and bled in Mesopotamia.


This entire Western enablement of totalitarian Islam has stuck in my craw to where I feel like vomiting.

Any further "liberation" of Muslim majority countries needs to involve bone crushing suppression of shari'a or nuclear weapons. Whatever middle ground there might have once been has shrunken into insignificance by the duplicity of Karzai with his heroin drug lords and Noor al Maliki's dalliance with terrorists like Moqtada Sadr.

It's why both of these "Muslim leaders" are on my hit list.

no2liberals said...

I know many Kurds, many of whom have moved back, mostly to the Erbil area.
Some are Christian, and I have not heard any of them discuss a problem with their religion.
The problems in Mosul, directed against the Kurds, comes from Al Qaida and their friends. Here is an official statement from the KRG. A man I have known for years, is an aide to Mr. Barzani.
As for the PKK, most Kurds really don't like how they conduct themselves, but at the same time, are sympathetic to their shared goal of an independent Kurdistan.
Of course, a sovereign Kurdistan is not likely to ever occur, with the Turk's vicious approach, along with Syria, and Iran. The original map of Kurdistan, drawn after the Treaty of Sevres, which was never enacted and was superseded by the Treaty of Lausanne, included land in all four countries.
What is interesting about the Israelis selling these systems to Turkey is, the old alliance between Israel and Turkey is based on it's being a secular nation. As that is rapidly changing, the old friendly feelings between the Kurds and Israel, could well be the new order.
An interesting article I found, among many.
The Natural Alliance of Kurdistan and Israel.

"For their part, the Israelis share a good deal of the blame. They have not made the mental leap to realize that Kurdistan will be the strong ally they need. In a disgraceful manner, Israeli officials refer to the Kurds as Turkey's problem in the same breath as they refer to Palestinian terrorists. This is neither acceptable nor worthy of a country that respects freedom.

What both Israel and Kurdistan need to do is enact and declare an open and full political and military relationship. In the short term, this radical move will agitate the region. But this relationship is coming, just as is the independence of Kurdistan. The sooner we see it, the better."


I think the last sentence is unrealistic, as much as I would like to see it.

As for Iraq, I still think removing Saddam was the right thing to do, without reservations. My preference for their form of government and laws doesn't matter. It certainly won't be Jeffersonian, even though the Sharia aspect is disturbing. It is the model they are most familiar with. Just ask the Brits.

Anonymous said...

Israel shouldn't be arming any Muslim nation, period. And first world countries shouldn't be providing arms to third world countries for any reason. It always turns out badly.

Regarding the Iraq war, I was a warmonger from the beginning and supported the war for quite a while. This past year, when it became obvious even to me that the whole "war on terror" was a con and was having the exact opposite effect that it was supposed to, I had to admit to myself that the antiwar hippies had been right all along. I removed the "support our troops" ribbon from my car, because that's usually seen as pro-war. I assumed I'd replace it with a plain American flag, but then I realized, I'm not even patriotic anymore. The government has gone too far, they've completely lost me.

Armance said...

"Israel shouldn't be arming any Muslim nation, period. And first world countries shouldn't be providing arms to third world countries for any reason."

The Westerners - Israel included - are in desperate search of "moderate Muslims" and "secular Muslim states", to confirm their theory about a reasonable Islam opposed to a fanatical one. Few examples to base their theory on. As rare as the unicorns. So they fell for and embraced Turkey, among the few Muslim states whose inhabitants, at least partially, don't look like brainwashed androids. Appearances are deceptive, theory doesn't always fit practice. The secular Turkey refuses to admit one of the biggest slaughters in history, the Armenian genocide, and "Mein Kampf" has been no. 1 on the bestsellers list for years. I mean, if a moderate enjoys reading "Mein Kampf" and denies a massacre, how does an extremist look like? Yet, in spite of all evidence, the West continues to favor the NATO member, UE candidate, modern, secular Turkey, a country where Catholic priests and Armenian journalists are still killed nowadays. So much about secularism in Islam. Similar to the idea of exporting democracy in Iraq.