Monday, December 12, 2005

You Don't Have To Be a Lawyer To Be A Dhimmi, But It Helps

 
Jihad Watch has announced the winners for Dhimmi of the Year. The American prize went to Ramsey Clark, former Attorney General and all-around public servant and idiot savant.

Clark’s curriculum vitae is well-enough known, but not having the particulars nailed down, I went a-googling to see what I could find. There were lots of lists and articles, including the usual Wikipedia allotment for a man of, shall we say, his stature. But no particular hit stood out until I tried using the “search within results” function. Another blogger once suggested that should one desire to find the flaws in a particular item (I do believe he was speaking of electronic gadgets) that searching within results using the word “sucks” would bring forth interesting items.

My word, was he ever right! Here is Sandmonkey’s post from December 6th: Ramsey Clark Sucks. To the point, no? This is his blistered opening pass:
    The New York Times has done it's best to make Ramsey Clark- ex-US attorney general and Saddam's Lawyer- look a little better than the douche bag that he is in their piece on him. But thankfully, the truth shines clearly through the cracks of their B.S
Now, already, I know this is my kind of thinker. He has the same take on the Old Grey Whore that I do — though I rather think his appellation for Mr. Clark — douche bag? — as one more appropriate for The New York Times rather than its subject.

But that’s a small quibble, for Sandmonkey is following the story closely, and he sees the truth shining through (Truth often does that if the clods aren’t too thick). Here, from the very mouth of Herself:
     It is a remarkable roll call, the men who have had him at their side at times of confrontation with America and its government: Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi of Libya, Slobodan Milosevic of the former Yugoslavia, Charles Taylor of Liberia; and, at home, fringe figures like the Branch Davidian leader David Koresh, the right-wing gadfly Lyndon LaRouche, and Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman, who is serving a life term in an American jail for his role in the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993.
A “remarkable roll call”? Is that what they term it? How about an allusion to the fact that those who lie down with dogs wake up with fleas?

Ramsey Clark must indeed be the scratchingest man in the Western hemisphere.

There will be few who won’t concur with Jihad Watch’s conclusions about this man. There may not be sufficient words to convey the opprobrium in which he is held by many of his fellow Americans. Still, it’s nice to see that an Egyptian has the same ideas about what justice means for Saddam Hussein. I mean, if you can use those two things — justice and Hussein — in the same sentence.

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On a related subject -- since we are speaking of dhimmi attorneys -- the essay on the phenomenon of top-drawer trial lawyers flocking to Gitmo to represent (pro bono, of course) the terrorists who want to kill all of us (including said attorneys), see The National Review for an essay by Deroy Murdock, “Gitmo Legal: Why are top-notch law firms aiding Gitmo detainees?”

What is most fascinating about these folks — forget their "progressive" claptrap agit prop about injustices that break down along gender, class, and racial lines. Just figure this one out: the attorneys from these firms who fly down to hold hands with the terrorists are from the very same firms which represent the companies that built the planes which terrorists flew into the Twin Towers, and the airlines which owned the planes, just to name two creepy connections.

We already know that law firms, even more than mere lawyers, are responsible for much of the mischief in this country. Their reach into all sections of our culture has become a cancer, but with this move into terrorist country, they represent a metastasis. Originally, I’d planned to extract just my favorite firm (in Richmond) from Mr. Murdock's list as an example of the perfidy of “the Guantanamo Bay Bar Association” (to use Mr. Murdock’s term). But perhaps you ought to see the whole ugly truth of Mr. Murdock’s research for yourself:
    *Covington & Burling (520 lawyers; $337.5 million in expected 2005 earnings). Clients: Coca-Cola, Deere & Co., Emory University, Goodyear, IBM, Merck, Microsoft, the NFL, UBS, and 13 Yemeni enemy combatants at Guantanamo.
*Dorsey & Whitney, Minneapolis (640 lawyers; estimated 2005 gross: $330 million). Clients: 3M, Cargill, ConocoPhillips, General Mills, Northwest Airlines, and six Bahrainians at Guantanamo.
*Holland & Hart, Denver (300 attorneys in twelve offices). Clients: Safeway, Sears, the Williams Company, and five Algerian terror suspects, including Dr. Abu Muhammed, Abbar Sufian al Hawary, and Motai Saib.
*Hunton & Williams, Richmond, Virginia (“850 attorneys. 16 offices. Since 1901”). Clients: Bank of America, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Eli Lilly, General Dynamics, General Electric, and six Yemeni suspected terrorists, including Issam Hamid Ali Bin Ali Al Jayfi.
*Paul, Weiss ($504 million estimated 2005 revenues). Clients: Chubb, DirecTV Group, I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby, Philip Morris, Time Warner, Viacom, and eleven Saudi Guantanamites.
As one U. S. attorney put it, these people could be helping the survivors of Hurricane Katrina:
    “Why our best law firms would dedicate their pro bono resources to suspected terrorists rather than, say, people rendered homeless by Katrina, is beyond me,” marvels one former high-level federal attorney who has been involved with these issues. “By definition, these representations only serve to expand the rights of alien enemy combatants during wartime.”
Their treason is beyond me, too. Perhaps Mr. Spencer at Jihad Watch could keep them in mind for next year’s Dhimmi Awards.

Can you think of a more deserving group?


N.B. Deroy Murdock is a syndicated writer and an advisory board member of Project 21. Check it out.

6 comments:

John Sobieski said...

Well that's just frigging disgusting. Pro bono work fighting our government for terrorists. A class act of pretentiousness from the snake den I see. You can hear their reasoning - strengthing human rights in the greatest democracy in the world blah blah blah. I am sure they are also doing pro bono work for illegal aliens.

hank_F_M said...

I was reading a post on another blog a few days ago on Mr Ramsey.

It seems while he has the habit of defending high profile crooks if the crooks can make their crimes look political, he lost all or almost all of the cases.

Except for the possibility that Mr. Ramsey’s record is so bad that having him as defense attorney could be called a denial of a fair trial, let him defend Sadam.



Are those attorneys really working pro bono?

I would not be surprised if there is a Middle Eastern contingency client paying big bucks that never calls on their services. But maybe I’m just being cynical.

Kirk Parker said...

Uhh, I think Clark goes by "Ramzi" these days.

neo-neocon said...

A little while back, I did one of those in-depth pieces on Ramsey Clark's life and times. The behavior of someone like Clark holds a certain fascination for me: how does a person get from here (civil rights champion and Attorney General under Johnson) to there (defending every dictator and offender against civil rights and liberty that he can lay his hands on)?

This is my take on the subject, "Ramsey Clark rides again."

In addition, there's this recent addendum on what's behind Clark's sympathy for the devil-ish.

Jesse Clark said...

First of all, I should mention that I share no relation to Ramzi Clark. (Whew!) Also, I agree that the title of 'douchebag' is spectacularly appropriate for him, but it is one of my favorite words and I hate to see it wasted.

Second of all, since when is Lyndon LaRouche 'right-wing'?

El Jefe Maximo said...

Yeah, my profession makes me weep sometimes. Lenin was more right than not about the sellers of the rope.